Book Review: The Shock of The Fall

image– Nathan Filer

‘I’ll tell you what happened because it will be a good way to introduce my brother. His name’s Simon. I think you’re going to like him. I really do. But in a couple of pages he’ll be dead. And he was never the same after that.’

The Shock of the Fall is an extraordinary portrait of one man’s descent into mental illness.

Matthew is a 19 year old with a mental illness. He lost his younger brother when they were both children, and Simon lives on in Matthew’s head. Matthew’s voice in the book is quite hard to get to grips with at first in my opinion. His thoughts are confusing, and you’re never really sure whether he’s talking the truth. It had me reading on because I wanted to make sense of it. As a result, the writing itself was very disjointed, and whilst I occasionally found it difficult to read, I felt like it really fit in with the story, and with Matthew having schizophrenia. Everything pulled together to make the story flow.

This book was a weird one for me. I was expecting quite an easy read, but I clearly hadn’t looked at the descriptions/reviews in enough depth! I feel like this review is terrible, but this book just wasn’t what I was expecting at all! I enjoyed it, I didn’t love it as much as I expected to considering all the rave reviews it had!

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